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  • INVESTMENT

    Investing means, making more money on your money towards increasing your wealth. An investment is anything you purchase for future income or benefit. In other words, anything not consumed today and saved for future use can be considered an investment. Income earned from your investments and any appreciation in the value of your investments increases your wealth. Before we take a look at the different financial products, it is important to know the basic principles of investing!

  • TAX SAVING INSTRUMENTS

    With only two months left, the countdown timer has started. The moment
    has arrived for those taxpayers who are yet to take advantage of tax
    savings instruments to sit up. You can bring down your tax liability
    substantially by investing in Section 80C instruments. The amount of
    money invested in these instruments should be based on your income, age
    and risk profile.

  • 11 smart ways to get out of debt and stay out of debt

    In spite of steady, regular income there are so many individuals who live pay cheque to pay cheque, carry their credit card outstanding, and fail to save anything for their retirement. If you are one among them, now is the right time to take some smart action to come out of debt and stay out of debt. It is not only possible; it is unbelievably achievable.

  • How Do I Invest Money in the Stock Market?

    There are two choices you have while investing in the stock market – active investing and passive investing. In the active style, you pick your own investments and make all the decisions about your money. In the passive style, you simply let your investments mirror a stock index or a collection of stocks selected by a third party.

    When you hear the term investing – most people are referring to the former. A lot of people believe that you have to constantly monitor the market and keep on top of all the news about stocks you own. Whats ironic about all this ‘active’ management is that even after all this monitoring the odds are against you to beat the benchmark such as the BSE Sensex Index. If you think this is a lot of work for very little return you can choose the more ‘passive’ style. In this form of investing, you pick an index and buy an ETF that mirrors the returns of the index. All other things being equal, your returns will mirror that of the indexes with very little management or research on your part.

  • Time Tested Classic Trading Rules for the Modern Trader to Live :

    Everybody knows these truisms in their hearts, but this list is nicely edited and makes a good read.
    1. Plan your trades. Trade your plan.

    2. Keep records of your trading results.

    3. Keep a positive attitude, no matter how much you lose.

    4. Don’t take the market home.

    5. Continually set higher trading goals.

    6. Successful traders buy into bad news and sell into good news.

  • TEN DEADLY TRADING MISTAKES

    Many individuals who have remained highly successful in other business ventures have failed miserably in trading game. Because they have a fairly big ego and thought they couldn’t fail. Their egos become their downfall because they can not except that they would be wrong and refuse to get out of bad trades. Once again, whoever or wherever has any one come from does not concern the markets…

  • WHEN YOU KNOW WHERE ECONOMY IS HEADING, YOU KNOW WHAT TO DO

    The Edelweiss ET-Now Lead Indicator Index (EELII), which is a composite weighted average index of a number of macro-variables exhibiting strong predictive ability of the core trends in the Indian economy, continues to strengthen. EELLII has been closely predicting the upturn in the economic cycle during the past few quarters. From a trough of ~73 in Q4FY09, EELII reached ~115 by Q4FY10….

  • A normal monsoon for 2010? (EDELWEISS)

    Weather forecasts see high probability of normal monsoon in 2010 • After a dismal performance by the southwest monsoon in 2009, recording a rainfall deficiency ~22% of long period averge (LPA), southwest monsoon 2010, for India, is expected to be ‘largely’ normal, as forecasted by The International Research Institure (IRI) for Climate and Society…

  • The “Great Risk Shift” – or why it may be time to re-think the developed-/emerging-markets distinction (DEUTSCHE MARKETS)

    After defaulting on their external loans during the 1980s, many emerging markets (EM) experienced often severe financial crises during the second half of the 1990s and in the early 2000s. Most top-tier EM have weathered the global crisis much better in terms of public-debt sustainability and the short/medium-term growth outlook than many developed markets (DM).

  • Do Asian countries still have a risky debt structure? (NATIXIS)

    We propose in this study to analyze the debt structure trends of the institutional sectors of six emerging economies in Asia and the risks related to them. The large proportion of contracted external debt (regardless of the institutional sector) had in fact been identified as one of the main sources of external vulnerability of these economies at the time of the Asian crisis in 1997….

  • Indian Infrastructure Outlook 2010 (FITCH RATINGS)

    Fitch Ratings has a stable outlook for 2010 on its portfolio of rated infrastructure project debt; this represents an array of project asset classes, including roads, airport, power, water and rail. The ratings, especially for projects under construction, are at low levels. Construction delays continue to be a major irritant, with a number of factors outside the control of project sponsors…

  • Do Asian countries still have a risky debt structure? (NATIXIS)

    We propose in this study to analyze the debt structure trends of the institutional sectors of six emerging economies in Asia and the risks related to them. The large proportion of contracted external debt (regardless of the institutional sector) had in fact been identified as one of the main sources of external vulnerability of these economies at the time of the Asian crisis in 1997….

  • ASIA STRATEGY: Value buying opportunities emerging

    With global economic growth firming – albeit in fits and starts — and monetary conditions likely to remain very loose for an extended period of time, the macro backdrop is, broadly speaking, supportive of healthy equity market conditions. Earnings forecasts are also far from unreasonable, in our view, compared to previous recoveries. All this adds up to a healthy outlook for Asian equities…

  • GREED & FEAR: Housing and samba (CLSA)

    The Greek bullet has been dodged for a while with a suspiciously easy sale of €5bn worth of 10-year Greek bonds last week at a yield of 6.25%. So suspiciously easy in the sense that the Greeks are now reportedly rushing to sell another €10bn worth of Greek bonds. The buyers would seem to be European state related banks adopting a buy and hold strategy…

  • BANKING: Cherry-picking key to outsized returns (CENTRUM)

    We believe a combination of defensive bets within the sector and a strategy that would call for reduction in betas would be stocks to bet heavily on within the Indian financial sector. Banking stocks with lower C/D ratios, adequate capitalization (not exceeding 11% in Tier I) and better resource franchise will likely be better positioned to deliver superior returns….

  • INDIAN BANKING: The New Guideline: Introducing the Base rate (FIRST GLOBAL)

    The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has decided to take a more activist (or micro-management) role in management of banks including the pricing of credit facilities and the calculation of interest on deposits. A series of moves it has undertaken to this end will have significant implications for the banking sector, from margins to relative competitive positioning of banks….